Tag Archives: pitot tube

Walkthrough of my workshop

It’s been a while in the making after a few requests over the past several months, so I finally took the time and do a walkthrough of my Workshop where I’m building my Sling TSi.

Apart from walking through my garage workshop setup and a bunch of the tools I’m using throughout the build, I’ve also given a small update on my current tasks. I’m waiting for the balance tube to finish off the ailerons and I’m currently finishing up the installation of the pitot tube, after running the electrical wiring the other day.

I’ll make a separate post on the installation of the pitot tube when I’m done, but here’s a preview picture of the first fitting to figure out the length of the tubing:
Fitting the pitot tube to figure out the correct length of the tubing

 

Pitot Electrical Wiring

Hours: 5

After cutting the hole for the inspection panel a few days ago, I continued and ran the wires for the heating.

I figured out where I want to run the wires a while back after some tinkering and I am using one of the strut channels for the length of the wing, except the very end at the wing-walk where I had to make one curve down the bottom.

After some trial and error, I found that 3/8 in size wire loom tubing fits perfectly in the channel and with the help of my Wireless Endoscope connected to my phone I was able to finagle it through the wing with some mild scrapes on my arms.

Starting to run the wire loom  Wire loom at the new Pitot Inspection hole Fishing for the loom (very bottom with the pliers)

The hardest part was figuring out a good way to come out the bottom where the wing-walk is, since the strut channel doesn’t go through there. On the last picture above, you can see when I finally managed to grip on to where I want the loom to come out of with the help of some duckbill pliers, which were a suggestion from my EAA chapters Technical Counsellor when he visited a few months ago.
Duckbill pliers to the rescue

Running the wire

With the question of where to run the wire solved, onto actually running the wires.

I am installing the Garmin GAP 26 Heated/Regulated Pitot Tube, which comes with a Regulator that needs to be installed next to the Pitot tube and controls whether the Pitot tube actually needs to be heated.

For this, there are three wires to run – two for the power and one for the discreet output, which integrated into the Garmin G3X Panel to show when the Pitot Tube is actually heated.

I ran the three wires through some braided sleeving to give them some extra protection and make running them through the wire channel easier in one go.Feeding the 3 wires into the braided sleeve

With that out of the way it “just” took a lot of back and forth, more use of the Endoscope and the thin arms of Juliana and repeated shouts of “push, push” and together we managed to run the wire all the way. She cheerfully pronounces “Congratulations, it’s a wire” as it came out the other end.
My friendly helper to run the Pitot wiring Congratulations, it's a wire

Cutting Pitot inspection panel hole

Hours: 1.5

I was planning to finish to Ailerons, but unfortunately in my final prep, I realized that I received two right side balance tubes instead of a left and a right one. The missing tube should be here sometime next week, so until then, the Ailerons are on pause.

This gave me some time to finally make the big step of cutting out the hole in the Wing for the Pitot inspection panel. I received the heated & regulated Garmin Pitot tube from the Factory and verified that it will fit nicely on the back of the round inspection cover, so I will mount that and I can keep my square inspection panel I designed for some other time.

First I did a lot of measuring and marking based on the plans. Since this is truly a moment of measure-twice, cut-once I measured and re-measured a few times.
Marking the center and hole to cut out Hole marked and alignments checked Time to prepare the cutter Marking the pilot hole for the cutter

With all the marks in place, I started with cutting the pilot holes for the center mark and the cutting head.
Using the center punch to mark the pilot holes Using the step drill to upsize the cutter pilot hole Pilot holes drilled

The final moment of truth – Time to cut the hole for the inspection panel using my nibbler cutting tool.
Time to cut a hole in the wing

I cut the first half of the circle and then reversed the tool since the Pitot tube mast was in the way of completing the cut in one direction.
First half of the circle cut - I had to reverse the tool at this point since the pitot tube mast blocked finishing the circle from this direction

The cut came out pretty well and I just had to do a little bit of sanding to smooth the edges.
Inspection hole cut Temporary placing of the backing plate Inspection Cover fits perfectly

 Timelapse video of cutting the hole

Cutting a round inspection access panel hole

Hours: 2

One of the things that the factory forgot as part of the change from the Sling 4 to the Sling TSi was the required access to the internals of the wing next to the Pitot tube.

In the Sling TSi design, some inspection panels were removed including the one next to the Pitot tube. By itself, if someone was building the wings from scratch, that might be fine as long as the builder installs the Pitot tube beforehand and doesn’t anticipate to ever need to access it, such as if using an unheated Pitot tube.

However, I am going to use the Garmin heated & regulated Pitot tube, which not only requires wires to be run to the Pitot tube, but also that I need to mount the regulator unit next to it.

Since I ordered the quickbuild, I ordered it with this specification, but unfortunately the factory didn’t receive the Pitot tube from their supplier in time and shipped my kit without installing it.

So after I received my shipment and inspected everything, I realized that installing this after the fact wasn’t going to be easy, particularly with the lack of a hole in the wing. Unfortunately the factory also forgot to run the wiring to the pitot tube, which creates a whole second issue, for which I’ve been working on a solution.

I informed the factory a while ago and also gave Matthew, one of the other TSi builders a heads-up since he hadn’t started on the wings yet. The factory realized their mistake in the plans and promised to come up with a solution and send me instructions and a plan.

Drafting a plan

While I was waiting for the factory to come up with a plan, I actually started drawing up my own plans to fabricate the entire inspection panel myself and used it as an opportunity to learn and use Solidworks, which I can use for free as part of being an EAA member.
Initial draft of the panel on paper My panel design in Solidworks

Since I had the chance to chat with Mike Blyth at Oshkosh for a while and we chatted about my build, I mentioned that I was still waiting for the factory to come up with a plan for the inspection cover and he promised that he’d check on the progress when he got back to South Africa and indeed, two weeks later, I got an email with the plans.

The factory plans, in keeping with the other inspection access panels, uses the same flush round inspection cover that is used to access the Flaps and Aileron connecting rods.

Factory plans for the new inspection access panel

Since I am still busy with other things in the build and haven’t actually made my own panel yet, I am going to go with the factory plans that they have drawn up for me.

Cutting a round inspection access panel hole

There is just one difficulty to overcome – the access panel is round and large and I don’t think there are 143.4 mm drill bits I can buy in Home depot.

After a bit of research, I found a solution in using a drill attachment sheet metal nibbler that can cut around a center pivot and can attach to my Milwaukee hand drill.

Since this is quite an operation, I decided to get some practice with the tool on a piece of spare aluminum and also made a video of it, since I figured that it might be helpful for other builders in the future.

I started by marking out the circle using a drafting compass. It’s been quite a few years, but luckily I still remembered how to use it and how to find the center of the circle again by making two marks. Proof that you may indeed use what you’ve learned in geometry class sometime in life, even if it’s 15 years later. After that I clamped the piece of metal on the edge of the table.

I drilled the center pivot hole to 1/8th of an inch, which makes the pivot sit in the hole and then measured out the starting hole for the drill, make a starter hole and then used a step drill bit to upsize the hole until it aligned with my marked circle.

After that, I set up the drilling tool with the pivot and made sure that the outside of the cutting bit aligns with my circle and then attached the drill and went to work.

Here are a couple of pictures of the first circle I cut – note that briefly I had the pivot point jump out of the hole, which caused me to waver a bit which you can see towards the bottom where it’s not perfectly round, so make sure the pivot continues to stay in the hole.

Marking out the circle using a compass Clamping down the metal on the table Cut hole and the inside disk - I did waver a little bit on the bottom as I didn't hold the pivot in place perfectly for a moment. So practicing this will pay off to not repeat the mistake. Inspection cover "test fit" Tools used to cut the access panel

Annotated video of the process of cutting the hole