Cutting a round inspection access panel hole

Hours: 2

One of the things that the factory forgot as part of the change from the Sling 4 to the Sling TSi was the required access to the internals of the wing next to the Pitot tube.

In the Sling TSi design, some inspection panels were removed including the one next to the Pitot tube. By itself, if someone was building the wings from scratch, that might be fine as long as the builder installs the Pitot tube beforehand and doesn’t anticipate to ever need to access it, such as if using an unheated Pitot tube.

However, I am going to use the Garmin heated & regulated Pitot tube, which not only requires wires to be run to the Pitot tube, but also that I need to mount the regulator unit next to it.

Since I ordered the quickbuild, I ordered it with this specification, but unfortunately the factory didn’t receive the Pitot tube from their supplier in time and shipped my kit without installing it.

So after I received my shipment and inspected everything, I realized that installing this after the fact wasn’t going to be easy, particularly with the lack of a hole in the wing. Unfortunately the factory also forgot to run the wiring to the pitot tube, which creates a whole second issue, for which I’ve been working on a solution.

I informed the factory a while ago and also gave Matthew, one of the other TSi builders a heads-up since he hadn’t started on the wings yet. The factory realized their mistake in the plans and promised to come up with a solution and send me instructions and a plan.

Drafting a plan

While I was waiting for the factory to come up with a plan, I actually started drawing up my own plans to fabricate the entire inspection panel myself and used it as an opportunity to learn and use Solidworks, which I can use for free as part of being an EAA member.
Initial draft of the panel on paper My panel design in Solidworks

Since I had the chance to chat with Mike Blyth at Oshkosh for a while and we chatted about my build, I mentioned that I was still waiting for the factory to come up with a plan for the inspection cover and he promised that he’d check on the progress when he got back to South Africa and indeed, two weeks later, I got an email with the plans.

The factory plans, in keeping with the other inspection access panels, uses the same flush round inspection cover that is used to access the Flaps and Aileron connecting rods.

Factory plans for the new inspection access panel

Since I am still busy with other things in the build and haven’t actually made my own panel yet, I am going to go with the factory plans that they have drawn up for me.

Cutting a round inspection access panel hole

There is just one difficulty to overcome – the access panel is round and large and I don’t think there are 143.4 mm drill bits I can buy in Home depot.

After a bit of research, I found a solution in using a drill attachment sheet metal nibbler that can cut around a center pivot and can attach to my Milwaukee hand drill.

Since this is quite an operation, I decided to get some practice with the tool on a piece of spare aluminum and also made a video of it, since I figured that it might be helpful for other builders in the future.

I started by marking out the circle using a drafting compass. It’s been quite a few years, but luckily I still remembered how to use it and how to find the center of the circle again by making two marks. Proof that you may indeed use what you’ve learned in geometry class sometime in life, even if it’s 15 years later. After that I clamped the piece of metal on the edge of the table.

I drilled the center pivot hole to 1/8th of an inch, which makes the pivot sit in the hole and then measured out the starting hole for the drill, make a starter hole and then used a step drill bit to upsize the hole until it aligned with my marked circle.

After that, I set up the drilling tool with the pivot and made sure that the outside of the cutting bit aligns with my circle and then attached the drill and went to work.

Here are a couple of pictures of the first circle I cut – note that briefly I had the pivot point jump out of the hole, which caused me to waver a bit which you can see towards the bottom where it’s not perfectly round, so make sure the pivot continues to stay in the hole.

Marking out the circle using a compass Clamping down the metal on the table Cut hole and the inside disk - I did waver a little bit on the bottom as I didn't hold the pivot in place perfectly for a moment. So practicing this will pay off to not repeat the mistake. Inspection cover "test fit" Tools used to cut the access panel

Annotated video of the process of cutting the hole

 

Elevator Fiberglass tip countersink reinforcement

Hours: 1

The leading edges of the Elevator Fiberglass tips have flush rivets and so they need to be countersunk. The parts that need to be countersunk are reinforced to add thickness, but the reinforcements on my fiberglass tips wasn’t long enough, so I had to add some more so I can finish them.

As you can see in the picture below, the black reinforcement doesn’t go far enough for the last two rivets on the left that are also dimpled flush.
Reinforcement not long enough for the countersinking Marked out how far I need to extend the reinforcement

I got some one inch wide fiberglass cloth tape and mixed some epoxy to extend the area that needs reinforcement. I marked out how far I needed to extend and cut strips of the fiberglass cloth to size to apply.
Epoxy mixed and ready First layer applied

A few layers applied and set out to dry for a few hours and then I can countersink the holes.Finished with the reinforcements

Oshkosh 2019 recap

It’s been a busy few weeks after returning from Oshkosh, so it’s been a while since I’ve written an update.

Since I spent the whole week at Oshkosh, I had a lot of time to figure out various bits and pieces that will go into the airplane and talk to the various vendors. I also finally got to meet Adam and Steve from Midwest Panel Builders who I’m working with for the Avionics.

It was great to get a feel for various things including the control sticks – I will go with the Tosten grip.
Tosten control grip

Another thing I was looking at is the TCW Control Valve servo for the vent shutoff valve that the TSi has. The standard design for this is a physical shutter that I’m not a great fan of, as I feel it looks a bit out of place in the panel. So I was looking for alternative options and Adam mentioned this servo as a possible option. After I checked it out, I think indeed it might be a nicer solution and I will try to make it work. In fact I might also use it for the heating control.
TCW Control Valve servo

Aside from figuring out things for my own build, I also attended a lot of seminars, saw a lot of cool airplanes and the airshows and met a lot of interesting people and stories.

I also spent a lot of time lurking around the Sling tent and checking out various details of the completed Sling TSi that they had on display there. It was nice to see how a lot of the small details to the plans for the fit and finish were in this plane, which didn’t exist in Wayne’s TSi yet.

I was also able to meet a few of the other Sling builders at the Sling Ding meeting and had a long chat with Craig and Austin about our various builds. And I got to meet John & Marta King who I have to give credit to getting me through the ground school of my private and instrument training and ran into a few other people including Angle of Attack, Aviation 101, Jason Miller, JP The Candourist and Mike Patey and Draco the bush plane.
John & Martha King Angle of Attack, Aviation 101 and Jason Miller JP aka The Candourist Mike Patey Draco

Elevator Trim tab & left fiberglass tip fitting

Hours: 4

With the two main skins fitted onto the Elevator, I started looking at the trim tab and the side fiberglass tips.

First I figured out the correct orientation of the hinge that connects the Elevator and the trim tab and the right orientation of the trim tab. I temporarily clecoed them together to check that the clearances are good and it moves all fine.
Elevator trim tab temporarily mounted

Then I was searching for the brackets that go on top of the trim tab and realized that I got two different looking brackets. Since this looked off to me, I tried to squint real hard at the instruction manual to figure out which bracket is the right one. I also checked the Sling 4 instructions and asked Matthew if he had a picture of his brackets and with that figured out that I must have received one TSi and one Sling 4 bracket, so I put in a note with the factory so I can get the right bracket for my TSi.
This looked off to me - I figured out it's one TSi and one Sling 4 Trim tab bracket
Investigative work to figure out which bracket belongs

Securing the trim tab piano hinge

With that out of the way, I focused on thinking about securing the piano hinge that attaches the trim tab to the elevator. Since there is no natural stop for the pin that goes through the hinge on either side, it could happen that it becomes lose from vibration and thus could come out during flight, which would be bad. I research a bit on the topic and found this article from EAA on the use and installation of piano hinges.

One of the ways to secure the hinge is to drill a small hole through the last part of the hinge and install a safety wire. My hinge was luckily cut in a way that makes this approach very easy to achieve. I got out a small drill bit, mounted the hinge in my bench vise and drilled a hole on each side so I could run a safety wire through it.
EAA diagram to safety the hinge Hinge mounted in my bench vise to drill the hole for the safety wire Hole drilled for the safety wire Safety wire in place to test free movement while connected to the Elevator

Using the safety wire approach makes it easy to still remove it in the future, but ensures that the pin stays securely in the hinge.
Testing free movement of the trim tab with the safety wire in place

Fitting the left side fiberglass tip

For the last part of the day, I started on fitting the last part of the skin and the fiberglass tips. Since this requires moving around the tip from both sides, I moved the Elevator over onto some saw horses so I could access the bottom more easily.

First I clecoed the top skin in place and then I slowly fitted the fiberglass tip in place. In order to get the fiberglass tip to fit, I had to file a tiny bit at the back, but it was much easier than the Rudder tip fitting.

Once I had it in place, I started to hold everything tight together and started match-drilling holes into the fiberglass tip. I used liberal amounts of clecos to get a tight fit and everything looks good. Now I just need to repeat it on the other side.
Top skin clecoed in place Fiberglass tip fit in place and ready to match-drill Marking drill holes Fiberglass tip match-drilled

EAA Airventure Oshkosh 2019

I’m at EAA Airventure 2019 in Oshkosh for the week until Saturday.

Yesterday I had the chance to stop by the Sling booth and have a chat with Mike Blyth from The Airplane Factory.

I had a chat with Mike Blyth about the Sling

If you’re at Oshkosh and would like to meet up with me to chat about my build, feel free to contact me and I’ll also be at the Sling Ding Party on Thursday Evening at 5pm.

Stopped by the Sling Tent Hello from Oshkosh 2019

Elevator skin fitting

Hours: 3

First order of business for the Elevator skin was inspecting all edges and holes and there were a few edges that needed some deburring action.
Elevator skin edges needed some filing to remove the burrs

After deburring everything that needed attention, we wrapped the skins around the rib structure. Since the Elevator is a pretty big part, it was very helpful to have a second pair of hands for this.

The last thing I had to do before I can start on closing up the skin is to install the backing plate for the Trim motor inspection plate. The plans call for 1/8 rivets, but the holes were actually 3/32, so I had to first up-drill them. There’s also another small error in the plan, in that it says to rivet all 8 holes, but actually only 7 should be riveted, since the top hole is for the screw that holds the inspection plate in place.
Backing plate goes under the skin Holes are 3/32, so I needed to up-drill them to fit the 1/8 rivets Holes up-drilled and backing plate clecoed in place Quick test fit of the inspection plate

Elevator structure

Hours: 5.25

Time to finish off the Empennage and get the Elevator structure going. I received the replacement ribs that are bent just that little bit more in order to properly align with the reinforcement plates and skins and went to work to drill out the bad ribs and put in the replacements.

New ribs in place and a final picture of a few rivets that people that visited helped pull

After that, I went to work and torqued the bolts that connect the control rod and counterweight to the Elevator. There’s also a small support bracket that reinforces the center rib to spar attachment, which is a pretty tight fit, so I had to get out the manual hand riveter.
Torquing the AN bolts Bolts torqued and support plate riveted

My brother is currently visiting and is enjoying the riveting experience.
My brother enjoying the riveting experience

Once the center ribs were finished, we moved on to put the rest of the rib structure in place.Elevator rib structure finished Clecoing the ribs in place

After that I realized there’s a mistake in the plans as they instruct to rivet the edges that hold some of the side counterweights on, but there’s another small end rib that actually has to go on there as I found out after I checked the overall plan for the Elevator. Quickly drilled out the rivets and riveted on the part. A nice trick I learned from another builder for drilling out the rivets without damaging the holes they go through, is to only drill out the top of the rivet (the donut ring) and then use the center punch to push out the back of the rivet. This way you have less chance of enlarging the hole.
Error in the plan says to just rivet the endcap, but actually this part needs to be riveted onto the side End rib where it should go Holes drilled out and end rib ready to rivet

With the rib structure in place, time to work on fitting the skin.

Finishing the Flaps

Hours: 6

With the ribs for the Flaps out of the way, I am ready to finish the flaps. First order of business is to ensure that I have the ribs all in the right order.
Completed ribs laid out along the right Flap

Once that was figured out, I first clecoed the ribs in place to the bottom of the skins and then closed up the skins and clecoed the top as well.
Ribs clecoed in place to the bottom of the Flaps skin Clecos in place to close up the right Flap

After checking that everything is aligning properly with the skins, I started riveting the skin. The top side is pretty straightforward. For the bottom side, there are a couple of tight spots next to the hinges, so the close quarter rivet wedge came in handy for a couple of the rivets.

Rivets in place Close quarter rivet wedge to rivet the tight space next to the hinge Bottom right side Flap ready to rivet Bottom right side flap almost done riveting

With the right side Flap finished and closed up, I then repeated it all for the left side Flap. There was also a couple of the edges where the hinges sit that needed a bit of deburring attention.
Some deburring was needed for the hole where the hinges go through Upside down view of the left side Flap ribs clecoed in place Almost done with the left side Flap riveting

After I finished the top skins, I did one quick alignment test fit on the wings and everything looked good, so then I finished up both sides by riveting the front rivet lane that closes the skin against the other side.
Front line ready to close up the skins of the Flaps for good Almost done riveting the Flaps Completed left Flap Both Flaps completed

Final alignment check

Once I finished all the riveting, I did one final test fit onto the wings. I used a bit of mason string and my laser level and everything is looking good. Now onto finishing the Elevator.
Final test fitting and alignment checks Final test fitting and alignment checks

Timelapse of building the Flaps

Getting started with riveting the Flaps

Hours: 2.5

With the priming of the Flaps ribs out of the way, I got started riveting the Flaps. First order of business was laying out all the ribs in the correct order.
Flaps ribs laid out in the correct order

After laying out the ribs in the correct order, I started laying out the right hinges to go with each rib. There is one interesting rib that needs to be riveted in two steps as one part goes on top of the other:
Hinge and bracket to be riveted onto the rib Ready to rivet those 3 rivets that will hide under the angled bracket Ready to rivet the bracket on top of the hinge

Once I figured all of that out of the right side Flaps, I repeated the steps for the left side Flaps:
Right side ribs done and laying out the left side

I received the missing rivets for the assembly the other day, so now I was able to finish the riveting all of the hinges to the ribs to actually complete the flaps.Completed ribs laid out along the right Flap

 

Flaps priming & Aileron inventory

Hours: 4

After having completed the inventory and preparing the edges and holes of the Flaps the other day, I went ahead to prime them so I can start assembling them.

As it turns out, cleaning the parts is a great time to chat with my mom over the phone, so she got to watch while I sat on my stool to give the parts a scrub using some Simple Green Cleaner to get them ready for priming.
Flaps parts laid out ready to clean Flaps parts ready for priming

Once that was done, I unfolded my small paint booth and primed all the ribs of the flaps.
Ready to prime the Flaps ribs Flaps ribs primed

Aileron parts inventory

With the Flaps primer drying, I moved on to unpack the Aileron parts and prepare them to prime next.

Unfortunately one set of ribs have some dents from the factory, so I will need replacements for those. The other parts were okay and just needed the usual treatment of deburring some of the edges and holes.
Dents in Aileron rib 2 Dents in Aileron rib 2

Then I went on a scavenger hunt to try to find an Eyebolt and Nut to go with the ribs as they weren’t in any of the bags of the Aileron assembly and eventually I figured that it might be on the pushrod that it threads into and I remembered that I have a separate Tube labelled Control Pushrods. So after opening that tube and pulling out a well packed bubble-wrap bundle I eventually found the rods for the Ailerons, and while I was at it, also the Flaps and attached to them were the Eyebolts and the nut mentioned.
Eyebolt mentioned in the Aileron assembly

The last thing I could not find, were the AN4-16A bolts, which are mentioned in the assembly instructions, but were not in the shipping manifest, so I added a request for those bolts together with the replacement for the damaged ribs.
I also found that I don’t have any 4.8x10mm rivets (HW-RIV-163) which I need for the Flaps assembly and those were also missing in the packing list, but need to be able to rivet some of the hinges onto the Flaps.

Hopefully I can get those replacements and missing parts soon so I can cut down on half-ready assemblies between the Elevator, Flaps & Ailerons.
Aileron parts laid out after I finished inspecting and deburring everything